Bruce Pascoe’s introduction to Louise Crisp’s new poetry collection ‘Yuiquimbiang’

Read. This is poetry. Both a praise and a lament for Country. Read. There is little like it. Australia struggles with an embrace of the past, but Louise Crisp does not flinch from the intimacy of fact. If there is regret here, there is also hope – hope and a plea to you, reader, to witness the works of those for whom the land is not their mother.

Aboriginal people were born from Mother Earth and have no alternative but total allegiance. But acceptance of the colonial means that the Australian frontier has been misrepresented in what has been taught in our schools, and the economy and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have been ignored. Country is that economy, and Crisp has devoted her life’s research to its upkeep. We must embrace the country beyond Donald Bradman, Vegemite and The Man from Snowy River. We have to look at the bush as its own place, not just as a repository for sheep and cattle.

Read the full text of Bruce’s introduction to Yuiquimbiang (Cordite Publishing Inc.) HERE.

Prime Minister’s Literary awards 2018: Gerald Murnane wins for ‘exquisite’ novel


Steph Harmon, ‘The Guardian’: 5th Dec 2018

Gerald Murnane has beaten Peter Carey, Richard Flanagan, Kim Scott and Michelle de Kretser to win $80,000 for his novel Border Districts in the fiction category at the 2018 Prime Minister’s Literary awards. Judged by panel, the awards are among the most prestigious in Australia and the richest, with $600,000 in total prize money awarded across six categories, including $5,000 for each of the 30 shortlisted authors.

More at ‘The Guardian’

‘It’s uncanny’: acclaim at last for Gerald Murnane, lost genius of Australian letters

Gay Alcorn, 21st Sept 2018, ‘The Guardian’

“I have something to say first,” says Gerald Murnane, to around 250 people who have come to hear Australia’s difficult literary genius in a rare outing. “You people here tonight can count yourselves fortunate … because this is going to be my last public appearance.”

Everyone laughs, including Murnane, who at 79 has said that before and stopped writing for many years before resuming. He’s finished with it now, he says, and Border Districts, released last year, will be his final novel.

More from Gay Alcorn at The Guardian

The world is being undone before us. If we do not reimagine Australia, we will be undone too

Richard Flanagan, ‘The Guardian’ 5th August 2018

When my father died at the age of 98 he had largely divested himself of possessions. Among what little remained was an old desk in which he had collected various writings precious to him over the years: poems, sayings, quotes, a few pieces he had written, some correspondence. Among them my elder sister found a letter written by one of my father’s cousins many years before. In it she told my father that his mother, my grandmother, was of Aboriginal descent, and that in her family she had been brought up to never mention this fact outside of the home.

My father loved discussing interesting letters with his family. He never discussed this letter. Yet he kept it. The story of covering up Indigenous pasts was a common one in Tasmania, where such behaviour was for some a form of survival. There is no documentation to prove my father’s cousin’s story is true, but that doesn’t make it untrue. It leaves the story as an unanswerable question mark over my family.

The theme of this year’s Garma festival is truth telling. My father’s story is about the questions truth raises, and where the truth takes us. I don’t tell this story to claim I am an Indigenous. I have too much respect for Indigenous people to make such a claim.

More from Richard Flanagan at The Guardian

Stories in September (a Tasmanian film and writing project)

ENTER A STORY

Have you made a film or documentary, produced an audio feature or written a story about Tasmanian people or places recently? If yes, ‘Stories in September’ would love to hear from you.

Enter your story now for a chance to be part of the ’30 Stories in 30 Days’ event. Your work could be 1 of 30 stories selected to be be screened at the State Cinema in Hobart on September 1, and featured online throughout the month.

There are also some great prizes including three, 3-month residencies at Parliament Coworking, a night’s accommodation at MACq 01 Storytelling Hotel in Hobart and free subscription to ‘Stories in September’ for 12 months.

Story entries are open until midnight on July 15, 2018.

WATCH AND LISTEN
Do you love stories about Tasmania and its people?

If yes, then you’ll love ’30 Stories in 30 Days’ event which celebrates Tasmanian storytellers and brings together the mediums of film, audio and print for the first time, teaming up with the State Cinema to offer four sessions on Saturday September 1, filled with film, audio and print stories from all over Tasmania. Pre-release tickets to these screenings are available for purchase now. Seats will be limited so book early to avoid missing out.

You can also subscribe to this website from September 1 for just $30. Only subscribers will have access to watch and listen to our 30 Stories in 30 Days storytellers, plus a whole range of additional diverse and amazing Tasmanian stories for 12 months.

Link for story: http://storiesinseptember.com/

Anne Hathaway makes television appeal to find Tassie book to give to Ellen DeGeneres

(By Ellen Coulter, ABC News)

A Tasmanian illustrator and writer has been inundated with messages and emails from the United States after receiving a Hollywood shout-out on The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

During an interview on the program, Oscar-winner Anne Hathaway told host Ellen DeGeneres she wanted to give her a gift: Jennifer Cossins’ “beautiful” book, A Compendium of Collective Nouns.

More at ABC News, 8th June 2018