‘Otoliths’, # 54

Issue fifty-four of Otoliths, the southern winter 2019 issue is now live.

It features Karl Kempton’s discourses 5 & 6, alongside text, visual, &, yes, aural work from Edward Kulemin, Tom Montag, Elaine Woo, DS Maolalaí, Lynn Strongin, Eric Hoffman, Irene Koronas, Doug Bolling, C.R.E. Wells, Owen Bullock, Daniel Y. Harris, Pete Spence, Sanjeev Sethi, Judith Roitman, Steve Dalachinsky, J. D. Nelson, Diane Keys, Rich Murphy, Norman Abjorensen, Kevin Tosca, Kyle Hemmings, John Greiner, Steve Kirby, Jim Leftwich, Pat Nolan, Scott Helmes, Thomas Fink, Heath Brougher, Michael Orr, Olchar Lindsann, Volodymyr Bilyk, Jim Meirose, Caleb Puckett, hiromi suzuki, Reuben Woolley, Mary Kasimor, Mark DeCarteret, Jonel Abellanosa, AG Davis, Dennis Andrew S. Aguinaldo, J. Crouse, Glenn Ingersoll, Daniel de Culla, Richard Kostelanetz, Michael J Leach, John Martone, Sophie Finlay & Matthew Hall, Sheila E. Murphy, John M. Bennett, Erik Fuhrer, Janna Grace, B. T. Joy, Drew B. David, Anne Gorrick, Márton Koppány, Ricky Garni, Thomas M. Cassidy, Rachel Cunniffe, David Baptiste Chirot, Linda M. Walker, Joel Chace, Joseph Buehler, Toby Fitch, Yoko Danno, Hugh Tribbey, Olivier Schopfer, Jeff Miller, Elmedic Kadric, Joseph Salvatore Aversano, M.J. Iuppa, Colin Stewart Jones, Brendan Slater, Natsuko Hirata, Joe Balaz, Hrishikesh Srinivas, Kellyn Elson, Robert Beveridge, Aidan Coleman, Javant Biarujia, Tony Beyer, Keith Higginbotham, Andrew Topel, Joseph Harrington, Clara B. Jones, Nick Nelson, Kristin Garth, Judith Skillman, Andrew Taylor, Jim George, Jeff Harrison, Jeff Bagato, Daniel f. Bradley, Texas Fontanella & Stuart Wheatley, Penelope Weiss, Dave Read, Keith Nunes, Anna Cates, Sacha Archer, Douglas Barbour, John Levy, Marilyn Stablein, M. C. Rush, Cecelia Chapman & Jeff Crouch, gobscure, Tim Wright, Jen Schneider, William Repass, Ian Gibbins, Jill Jones, Marcia Arrieta, Gian Luigi Braggio, Holly Day, Mary Ellen Derwis, Tim Pilgrim, John McCluskey, Les Wicks, R. Keith, Michael Brandonisio, Tom Beckett, Bob Heman, Ella Skilbeck-Porter, John Pursch, Jesse Glass, Kristian Patruno, Martin Stannard, & Demosthenes Agrafiotis.

Stephanie Conn in ‘Banshee’: the poem ‘Family Line’

It brings back fond memories to Tasmanians appreciative of poetry to read new work by Northern Ireland poet Stephanie Conn in Irish literary journal Banshee.

Stephanie was a guest in October 2017 of the Tasmanian Poetry Festival, coinciding with a visit to her sister-in-law who lives in the north of the island.

Since then she’s been busy with a new collection, published by Doire Press (Ireland) early in 2018 and entitled ‘Island’ (taking its inspiration from Stephanie’s ancestors, farmers and fishermen and women on Copeland Island off the County Down coast); John Foggin (6th Jan 2019) traces an appreciative appraisal of her work on his blog The Great Fogginzo’s Cobweb here. Also check out Northern Vision’s vimeo production Novel Ideas.

‘Keats is dead…’: How young women are changing the rules of poetry

Donna Ferguson, ‘The Observer’, 27 Jan 2019

“Publishers have noticed there is an appetite for the writing of women and that if they ignore that appetite, they are not going to sell as many books. Young women working in publishing can also see what is popular online and say: this has a market.”

Emma Wright, 33, was one of those women. She set up her own poetry publishing house, The Emma Press, at the age of 25 after noticing that all the big publishers and poetry magazines were run by men – and that certain styles of poetry were not being published. “And it wasn’t because it wasn’t good. It was just not represented. It wasn’t in vogue. But the form, the subject matter and the style really resonated with me. I thought: who are the tastemakers? They did tend to be these older men,” she says.

Read more at The Observer

Links: Walleah Press

Bruce Pascoe’s introduction to Louise Crisp’s new poetry collection ‘Yuiquimbiang’

Read. This is poetry. Both a praise and a lament for Country. Read. There is little like it. Australia struggles with an embrace of the past, but Louise Crisp does not flinch from the intimacy of fact. If there is regret here, there is also hope – hope and a plea to you, reader, to witness the works of those for whom the land is not their mother.

Aboriginal people were born from Mother Earth and have no alternative but total allegiance. But acceptance of the colonial means that the Australian frontier has been misrepresented in what has been taught in our schools, and the economy and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have been ignored. Country is that economy, and Crisp has devoted her life’s research to its upkeep. We must embrace the country beyond Donald Bradman, Vegemite and The Man from Snowy River. We have to look at the bush as its own place, not just as a repository for sheep and cattle.

Read the full text of Bruce’s introduction to Yuiquimbiang (Cordite Publishing Inc.) HERE.