Zenobia Frost — talking with Katy O’Brian

Zenobia Frost interviews Katy O’Brian (‘Z Nation’, ‘Black Lightning’) in the current issue of ‘Archer Magazine’.

Zenobia and Katy discuss questions pertaining to gender, sexuality and queer erasure … read their conversation here.


Katy O’Brian is an actor, writer and martial artist from Indianapolis, USA. She has appeared in a number of productions, including ‘Gnawbone’, ‘Power Rangers: Zenith’, ‘Halt and Catch Fire’ and ‘Z-Nation’.

Zenobia Frost is a poet based in Brisbane, Australia. Her books include ‘Salt and Bone’ and, most recently, the poetry collection ‘After the Demolition’ (Cordite Books) which won the 2020 Wesley Michel Wright Award and was shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

Journal ‘Plumwood Mountain’: Managing Editor and Editorial Administration Team

‘Plumwood Mountain’, an important and classy Australian journal working within the boundaries of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics, is seeking a Managing Editor and Editorial Administration Team.

This is interesting news on a number of levels, not least for the journal’s transparency and its openness to change…

It’s also interesting to read poet Peter Boyle’s response to the question —

‘…  in the current climate of ecological crisis and political wrangling over funding to the arts, what role do you feel poetry does, or could, play in our society?

— posed by Denise O’Hagan, in an interview published in ‘The Nib’ (Sept 2020):

As far as the ecological crisis goes, it is part of our consciousness. It infuses the world we live in, so the sense of living in dark times inevitably comes into the poetry any open, receptive poet writes. There is a strong eco-poetics movement in Australia and a journal like Plumwood Mountain features a lot of it. Many people write directly about environmental and social issues, and much very accomplished, very interesting poetry is written that way, but I think poetry can also operate more indirectly, in a subtler way. Personally, the poetry that speaks to me most can be about anything, or it might start with one thing and then slide into being about something else. I especially like poems that look for the spaces between things, sidestep and swerve, and end up taking me somewhere new.

Ralph


Managing Editor and Editorial Administration Team – Call for Expressions of Interest

Journal ‘Plumwood Mountain’ is in a time of transition.

After 7 years, Managing Editor Anne Elvey will be stepping down at the end of 2020. At the same time the Editorial Board intends to deepen its commitments to decentring or deemphasising the human in ecopoetics while holding this vision in a wider frame of cultural responsibility both in Australia and internationally.

“As part of our continuing affirmation of more-than-human agencies, of intersections between environmental activism and cultures of poetry, and of the complex entanglements of race, gender, sexuality, location and class in an emerging ecopoetics, the journal wants to expand its editorial board to reflect these commitments. As part of this development, the new Managing Editor has the option to find a new name for the journal.”

Expressions of interest are called for a Managing Editor and Editorial Administration Team that would with an Editorial Board shape the future of the journal and undertake the tasks of bringing it to publication. These are voluntary positions.

Three kinds of Expression of Interest are invited

From an individual who would become managing editor and who would build an editorial administration team; or

From a team of three or four who would take on the roles of managing editor and editorial administration team between them; or

From an existing journal in the fields of environmental humanities or literature which would incorporate, as a significant component, an ecological poetry and poetics section/corner as a successor to ‘Plumwood Mountain journal’ with a suitable dedicated editor.

The preference is for Indigenous leadership in the management and editorship of the journal, and diversity in the editorial administration teams and editorial boards that adds to existing diversities of representation on the board.

The incoming Managing Editor will be strongly encouraged and supported to explore funding opportunities to pay contributors to the journal and to cover administrative and management costs.

More at ‘Plumwood Mountain’.

Australian Book Review and the Australia Council

Australian Book Review, while congratulating successful applicants, deplores the Australia Council’s decision not to fund it and other literary magazines in the 2021–24 round. For the first time in decades, Australia’s national literary and arts review will not be funded by the federal government. 

We are witnessing a cultural bloodbath in Australia that has been years in the making

Some of Australia’s most important and innovative arts organisations have lost their federal funding: the lifeline that they had counted on to try and ride out these extraordinary times. The list of organisations being “transitioned out” of Australia Council funding includes the Sydney Writers’ festival; many of the nation’s literary magazines, including Australian Book Review, Overland and the Sydney Review of Books, and a long string of theatre and dance companies, such as Sydney’s Australian Theatre for Young People, Adelaide’s Restless Dance Theatre, Perth’s Blue Room and Melbourne’s famous small theatre La Mama.

  • By Ben Eltham, ‘The Guardian’, 6th April 2020. More at

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2020/apr/06/we-are-witnessing-a-cultural-bloodbath-in-australia-that-has-been-years-in-the-making

‘Otoliths’, # 54

Issue fifty-four of Otoliths, the southern winter 2019 issue is now live.

It features Karl Kempton’s discourses 5 & 6, alongside text, visual, &, yes, aural work from Edward Kulemin, Tom Montag, Elaine Woo, DS Maolalaí, Lynn Strongin, Eric Hoffman, Irene Koronas, Doug Bolling, C.R.E. Wells, Owen Bullock, Daniel Y. Harris, Pete Spence, Sanjeev Sethi, Judith Roitman, Steve Dalachinsky, J. D. Nelson, Diane Keys, Rich Murphy, Norman Abjorensen, Kevin Tosca, Kyle Hemmings, John Greiner, Steve Kirby, Jim Leftwich, Pat Nolan, Scott Helmes, Thomas Fink, Heath Brougher, Michael Orr, Olchar Lindsann, Volodymyr Bilyk, Jim Meirose, Caleb Puckett, hiromi suzuki, Reuben Woolley, Mary Kasimor, Mark DeCarteret, Jonel Abellanosa, AG Davis, Dennis Andrew S. Aguinaldo, J. Crouse, Glenn Ingersoll, Daniel de Culla, Richard Kostelanetz, Michael J Leach, John Martone, Sophie Finlay & Matthew Hall, Sheila E. Murphy, John M. Bennett, Erik Fuhrer, Janna Grace, B. T. Joy, Drew B. David, Anne Gorrick, Márton Koppány, Ricky Garni, Thomas M. Cassidy, Rachel Cunniffe, David Baptiste Chirot, Linda M. Walker, Joel Chace, Joseph Buehler, Toby Fitch, Yoko Danno, Hugh Tribbey, Olivier Schopfer, Jeff Miller, Elmedic Kadric, Joseph Salvatore Aversano, M.J. Iuppa, Colin Stewart Jones, Brendan Slater, Natsuko Hirata, Joe Balaz, Hrishikesh Srinivas, Kellyn Elson, Robert Beveridge, Aidan Coleman, Javant Biarujia, Tony Beyer, Keith Higginbotham, Andrew Topel, Joseph Harrington, Clara B. Jones, Nick Nelson, Kristin Garth, Judith Skillman, Andrew Taylor, Jim George, Jeff Harrison, Jeff Bagato, Daniel f. Bradley, Texas Fontanella & Stuart Wheatley, Penelope Weiss, Dave Read, Keith Nunes, Anna Cates, Sacha Archer, Douglas Barbour, John Levy, Marilyn Stablein, M. C. Rush, Cecelia Chapman & Jeff Crouch, gobscure, Tim Wright, Jen Schneider, William Repass, Ian Gibbins, Jill Jones, Marcia Arrieta, Gian Luigi Braggio, Holly Day, Mary Ellen Derwis, Tim Pilgrim, John McCluskey, Les Wicks, R. Keith, Michael Brandonisio, Tom Beckett, Bob Heman, Ella Skilbeck-Porter, John Pursch, Jesse Glass, Kristian Patruno, Martin Stannard, & Demosthenes Agrafiotis.

Issue 53 of ‘Otoliths’ is now live

Forget Coachella! Issue 53, the southern autumn, 2019, issue of Otoliths, has more variety & much more talent. Plays, poems, paintings, reviews, stories, collaborations galore.

This issue contains work from Lynn Strongin, Jeff Bagato, Pete Spence, Kyle Hemmings, Seth Howard, Andrew Topel, Jim Leftwich, Steve Potter, Sanjeev Sethi, David Baptiste Chirot, Alison Ross, Mike Callaghan, John M. Bennett, Stephen Bett, Jim Meirose, Joel Chace, John Bradley, Dah, Ian Ganassi, Laura Bell, Emilio Morandi, Steve Dalachinsky, Jacob Kobina Ayiah Mensah, R. Keith, Cecelia Chapman, Keith Polette, Daniel de Culla, M. Liberto Gorgoni, Olivier Schopfer, Mary Cresswell, Jack Galmitz, Anton Yakovlev, B. J. Muirhead, Nina Živančević, Gregory Kimbrell, Cameron Lowe, Pat Nolan, Richard Kostelanetz, Daniel f. Bradley, Sheila E. Murphy, Adam Fieled, Bill Wolak, Márton Koppány, M.J. Iuppa, Gregory Stephenson, Elaine Woo, Karl Kempton, J. D. Nelson, Carol Stetser, Neil Leadbeater, Texas Fontanella, Tony Mancus & CL Bledsoe, gobscure, David Lohrey, Douglas Barbour, Keith Higginbotham, Guy R. Beining, Sarah Sarai, hiromi suzuki, Thomas Fink, Maya D. Mason, Carla Bertola, Tom Beckett, Randee Silv & Mumtazz, Mark DuCharme, Michael O’Brien, Elmedin Kadric, Keith Nunes, Bob Heman, John Kalliope, Rebecca Ruth Gould, Charles Borkhuis, Tony Beyer, Kenneth Rexroth, Maralena Howard, Stu Hatton, Michael Brandonisio, Brian Glaser, Penelope Weiss, Stephen Nelson, Tom Daley, Bernie Earley, Anna Cates, Jeff Harrison, John Levy, Vernon Frazer, Miro Sandev, Sabine Miller, Christopher Barnes, Nick Nelson, Jimmy Rivoltella, Katrinka Moore, Joe Balaz, Marilyn Stablein, Paul Pfleuger, Jr., John Pursch, Joseph Buehler, Colleen Woods, Michael Philip Castro, Michael Prihoda, Henry Crawford, Wes Lee, & Gay Beste Reineck.

‘Liminal’ magazine: interview with Michelle D’Souza

‘Liminal’ magazine is a relatively young, energetic online space ‘for the exploration, interrogation and celebration of the Asian-Australian experience’.

To learn more of the magazine and its creative team, visit the 2017 Digital Writer’s Festival session, ‘A Platform of One’s Own: Liminal Magazine’.

The most recent issue of the magazine features Sumudu Samarawickrama’s interview with Michelle D’Souza, poet, critic and managing editor of Mascara Literary Review.

Can you tell us what you have planned for the future?
I have been working on my novel and a trickle of new poems. I’m delighted that UWAP are re-publishing my second poetry collection, Vishvarūpa, this year as it was out of print with 5 Islands Press who are closing shop. I’m also thrilled for the collection of stories that Margaret River Press are publishing, We’ll Stand In That Place, which I was privileged to judge.

Of course, I hope that as a community we can continue to support each other and expand our diverse, transnational spaces, reaching out to writers from other countries and being in conversation with writers and thinkers here in Australia. I am careful in what editing roles I might take up going forward as it has conflicted with my writing time.

I am also writing a scholarly essay on Interceptionality and the work of Behrouz Boochani as a way of reflecting on the unsettlement of Australian poetics.

Read more at Interview with Michelle D’Souza.

Stephanie Conn in ‘Banshee’: the poem ‘Family Line’

It brings back fond memories to Tasmanians appreciative of poetry to read new work by Northern Ireland poet Stephanie Conn in Irish literary journal Banshee.

Stephanie was a guest in October 2017 of the Tasmanian Poetry Festival, coinciding with a visit to her sister-in-law who lives in the north of the island.

Since then she’s been busy with a new collection, published by Doire Press (Ireland) early in 2018 and entitled ‘Island’ (taking its inspiration from Stephanie’s ancestors, farmers and fishermen and women on Copeland Island off the County Down coast); John Foggin (6th Jan 2019) traces an appreciative appraisal of her work on his blog The Great Fogginzo’s Cobweb here. Also check out Northern Vision’s vimeo production Novel Ideas.

States of Poetry Tasmania – Series Two

A. E. Houseman memorably said: I could no more define poetry than a terrier can define a rat. It’s not an easy matter to justify one’s decisions when faced with numerous poems from which to make a limited selection. There’s no programmatic guide to what makes a poem successful although the impact of a good poem is something we all know and recognise. Generally it has something to do with registering a sense of shock – it might be the shock of the new, unexpected or strange, or it might be the shock of the familiar – it can take one off guard to be confronted by what one knows but didn’t know one knew. And what creates the shock?

(Sarah Day, ‘State Editor’s Introduction’ to ‘States of Poetry Tasmania – Series Two’; more at Australian Book Review) – and featuring poetry by Anne Kellas, Gina Mercer, James Charlton, Jim Everett-puralia meenamatta, Ben Walter and Christiane Conésa-Bostock.