AMAZON HAS COME TO AUSTRALIA WITH ITS MODEL TO RECOLONISE OUR MARKETS AND MINDS

Independent presses represent our hope for the future. First the independent bookstores will feel the pinch; next it will be the independent publishers whose books are less likely to be stocked in the major bricks and mortar stores; writers will feel the crunch coming on their already low incomes; finally readers will miss out because the range of books available will be hugely diminished. Not only that, but marginal stories – and Australia is a marginal story in the global culture – will rarely be heard. If you are a reader, you might want to consider which books you buy and where. You might want to consider what will be left for your children to read. Will it be limited to mass-market American celebrity and violence stories? Or do you want something more?

Susan Hawthorne, The Guardian, 8th December 2017

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STYLUSLIT: A NEW BI-ANNUAL ONLINE LITERARY JOURNAL

StylusLit

StylusLit is a new bi-annual online literary journal, publishing poetry, short stories, creative non-fiction, interviews and reviews, and the first issue will go live in March 2017.

Only previously unpublished work is accepted, that is, the work has not appeared on radio or TV, and has not been published digitally (any website) or in print. Copyright remains with the author. Acknowledgment by the poet of any work first published in StylusLit would be appreciated.

StylusLit is accepting submissions for poetry, short stories and creative non-fiction. Submissions for first issue will be accepted from 14th November 2016 to 14th January 2017. Send to info@styluslit.com. Interviews and reviews are commissioned by the editor.

Submissions:

In the subject header of your email include the genre and the title of your piece, for example, ‘Short Story: The Girl in the Photograph’, and a 40 word bio in your email.

Poems:

Please submit up to three (3) poems at a time,
Please cut and paste poems into the body of the email,
Use font: Times New Roman 12px, and 1.5 spacing.
Short story or creative non-fiction:

Please submit not more than one (1) short story or creative non-fiction piece per submission period,
Please include title, word count and your name in the header of your attached document,
Maximum word length is 5,000 words,
Submit as .doc or .docx file,
Use font: Times New Roman 12px, and 1.5 spacing.
StylusLit is a non-profit organisation and is unable to pay contributors.

The StylusLit Team

Poetry Editor and publisher:
Rosanna Licari was the publisher and founding editor of Stylus Poetry Journal from 2002 to 2010. She was also a co-director of the Queensland Poetry Festival from 2002 to 2003. She completed her Master in Philosophy in creative writing (poetry) at the University of Queensland. Her collection, An Absence of Saints won the 2009 Thomas Shapcott Prize, the Anne Elder Poetry Prize and the 2011 Wesley Michel Wright Prize for Poetry, and was shortlisted for the 2010/211 Mary Gilmore Prize. In 2015, she won the inaugural Philip Bacon Ekphrasis Poetry Prize for her poem, ‘The Wait’. Her work has appeared in various journals and anthologies.

Short stories and creative non-fiction editor:
Andrew Leggett is a Brisbane writer and editor of poetry, fiction, reviews and interdisciplinary academic papers. He holds a master’s degree in creative writing (poetry) from University of Queensland and has recently completed a doctoral thesis in creative writing (a novel In Dreams and its exegesis on the place of dreams in the novel and the cinematic work of David Lynch). He edited the Australasian Journal of Psychotherapy from 2006-2011. His collections Old Time Religion and Other Poems (1998) and Dark Husk of Beauty (2006) were published by Interactive Press.

Review editor:
Alison Clifton has reviewed poetry anthologies, chapbooks, and collections for M/C Words, Cordite and the Australian Poetry Journal. She holds a First Class Honours degree in English from the University of Queensland and her thesis was a formal analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Her doctoral thesis in English Literature from the University of Queensland explored the work of the late British poet, Geoffrey Hill.

TURNING PAGES: WRITERS DESERVE MORE FROM THE GRANTS SYSTEM

Writers are made, not born, by investing time and money (usually their own) in their development, Forge says. They buy time to write by reducing paid working hours, writing hundreds of words for underfunded literary magazines and other outlets for a nominal fee (or for nothing but “exposure”) and spending every spare moment “practising their scales”. And support comes from a small, low-paid or voluntary army of workers: editors, festival directors, editorial assistants.

By Jane Sullivan; more at The Age, 12th November, 2016.

BOOK REVIEW: MELISSA ASHLEY’S ‘THE BIRDMAN’S WIFE’

Too often I hear (usually from men) that women never did anything in history to write about. What they are generally referring to are those ‘great deeds’ of men who were able to dedicate their lives to and sustain an uninterrupted focus on their area of specialisation. Women’s yearnings were sidelined and their lives circumscribed by multiple childbirth.

A.H. Chisholm wrote a ‘complete’ biography of Elizabeth Gould in 1944. In contrast, Melissa Ashley has written a fictional biography, or biographical fiction, of her in The Birdman’s Wife, which revitalises Elizabeth, colouring in her passions, her struggles, her continual negotiation of the demands of being a working artist and a mother.

This beautifully written novel presents a ‘complete’ picture of a family unit—that one man’s crowning achievements were in fact a family enterprise. John Gould may have been able to strut about like a peacock, but his ‘story’ his more complete when put in context alongside the female of his species, their young, and the materials from which he made his nest.

(From Kali Napier’s blog at Kali Napier)

REASONS TO WRITE

1. To make something beautiful. Beauty does not have to mean prettiness, but can emerge from the scope of one’s imagination, the precision of one’s words, the steadiness and honesty of one’s gaze.

2. To make something truthful. ‘Beauty is truth, truth beauty.’

3. To make use of what you have and who you are. Even a limited talent brings an obligation to explore it, develop it, exercise it, be grateful for it.

4. To make, at all. To create is to defy emptiness. It is generous, it affirms. To make is to add to the world, not subtract from it. It enlarges, does not diminish.

5. Because as Iris Murdoch said, paying attention is a moral act. To write truthfully is to honour the luck and the intricate detail of being alive.

………………………………………………..

‘Reasons to write’ is part of Charlotte Wood’s acceptance speech (19th April, 2016), on winning the 2016 Stella Prize literary award – celebrating women’s writing – with her novel The Natural Way of Things.

BE UNDER NO ILLUSION: MALCOLM TURNBULL WANTS TO DESTROY AUSTRALIAN LITERATURE

The democracy of thought and discussion that books make possible, the possibility of empathy that books are known to engender, the sense of a shared humanity and the transcendent possibilities that books give rise to, all will be diminished by this profound attack on Australian writing. And we will have returned to being what we were fifty years ago: a colony of the mind.

You have to ask if, at heart, this is not profoundly political, because the disenfranchisement of the imagination is ever the disempowerment of the individual. There is, after all, both a bitter irony and a profound connection in a government that would condemn the wretched of the earth as illiterate, while hard at work to rob its own people of their culture of words.

By Richard Flanagan; more at The Guardian, 19 May 2016