University of Western Australia’s decision to close publishing house sparks outrage

(Stephanie Convery, ‘The Guardian’, Fri 8th November 2019)

Five staff at UWAP will either have their contracts terminated or be made redundant as a consequence of the proposed shut down.

Publishing director Terri-Ann White said the decision came “completely out of the blue”.

“It was really surprising when we found out on Tuesday and we were delivered a document that outlined the next steps and intentions for the future,” she told Guardian Australia.

White said that UWAP had been “very open” to embarking on open-access and digital publishing alongside its print priorities, but that the university’s preference appeared to be to “close off one path and start another”.

White said she was very concerned about the lack of provision in the proposed shutdown for servicing the 350 authors on UWAP’s backlist, and for the future of the 35 books scheduled to be published in 2020.

More at ‘The Guardian’

Review: Vanessa Page’s ‘Tourniquet’, by Jena Woodhouse

Jena Woodhouse at ‘foam:e

The heartland of Tourniquet lies in the haunted, haunting terrain of its unsettled and unsettling topographies, including the body. As unsparing and unflinching in her gaze as the outback light, Vanessa Page has a sure grasp of her subjects and the poetic forms that can best accommodate them. In bringing a female gaze and sensibility to bear on the badlands and wastelands of personal relationships and landscapes, especially the marginal terrain of small, isolated settlements, and in seeking out the redemptive possibilities of reconnecting with body and spirit in physical encounters with country, she has generated some powerful poetry.

[Purchase ‘Tourniquet’]

Heather Rose: ‘When I get lost in my imagination I don’t feel the pain’

Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore, ‘The Guardian’, 7th October 2017

For her new novel, Bruny, Rose turns her attention to the Tasmanian island of the same name where she holidayed growing up and where she took her children camping and to the beach, just a short ferry ride from her home in Hobart.

“As a child it was always so captivating: you drive on, then you cross the channel and it always felt like going to another world,” she says. “And it was even more remote and even less populated. I think the silence down there really gets to me: there’s no traffic. You can almost hear the stars it’s so quiet.”

Bruny, however, is not a quiet novel; it is about explosions and warring political families and conflict. In it, America has an isolationist president; China has become a formidable world power; and Islamic State rules an expanding caliphate. What’s more, the Chinese and Tasmanian governments have invested in a new project, a $2bn bridge connecting Bruny Island to the mainland. The novel opens with a terrorist attack: the bridge has been blown up.

Cover image for Bruny by Heather Rose
 Photograph: Allen & Unwin

More at The Guardian

Book launch: Ron Moss, Hobart 23rd August 2019

  • When23 Aug 2019
  •  5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Location: Allport Library and Museum of Fine Arts, 91 Murray Street, Hobart 7000

Join us to celebrate the publication of Ron Moss’ new collection of haiku and ink paintings.

Broken Starfish

To be launched by Lyn Reeves

“With poetry and ink paintings, Broken Starfish completely satisfies, while it leaves me waiting for the next volume from this remarkably talented artist and poet.” – Ferris Gilli, Consulting Editor, The Heron’s Nest

“The best haiku reveal an absence of separation between the poet and that which inspires that poet. Ron Moss’s haiku consistenty demonstrates this.” – Christopher Herold, co-founder of The Heron’s Nest.

‘Otoliths’, # 54

Issue fifty-four of Otoliths, the southern winter 2019 issue is now live.

It features Karl Kempton’s discourses 5 & 6, alongside text, visual, &, yes, aural work from Edward Kulemin, Tom Montag, Elaine Woo, DS Maolalaí, Lynn Strongin, Eric Hoffman, Irene Koronas, Doug Bolling, C.R.E. Wells, Owen Bullock, Daniel Y. Harris, Pete Spence, Sanjeev Sethi, Judith Roitman, Steve Dalachinsky, J. D. Nelson, Diane Keys, Rich Murphy, Norman Abjorensen, Kevin Tosca, Kyle Hemmings, John Greiner, Steve Kirby, Jim Leftwich, Pat Nolan, Scott Helmes, Thomas Fink, Heath Brougher, Michael Orr, Olchar Lindsann, Volodymyr Bilyk, Jim Meirose, Caleb Puckett, hiromi suzuki, Reuben Woolley, Mary Kasimor, Mark DeCarteret, Jonel Abellanosa, AG Davis, Dennis Andrew S. Aguinaldo, J. Crouse, Glenn Ingersoll, Daniel de Culla, Richard Kostelanetz, Michael J Leach, John Martone, Sophie Finlay & Matthew Hall, Sheila E. Murphy, John M. Bennett, Erik Fuhrer, Janna Grace, B. T. Joy, Drew B. David, Anne Gorrick, Márton Koppány, Ricky Garni, Thomas M. Cassidy, Rachel Cunniffe, David Baptiste Chirot, Linda M. Walker, Joel Chace, Joseph Buehler, Toby Fitch, Yoko Danno, Hugh Tribbey, Olivier Schopfer, Jeff Miller, Elmedic Kadric, Joseph Salvatore Aversano, M.J. Iuppa, Colin Stewart Jones, Brendan Slater, Natsuko Hirata, Joe Balaz, Hrishikesh Srinivas, Kellyn Elson, Robert Beveridge, Aidan Coleman, Javant Biarujia, Tony Beyer, Keith Higginbotham, Andrew Topel, Joseph Harrington, Clara B. Jones, Nick Nelson, Kristin Garth, Judith Skillman, Andrew Taylor, Jim George, Jeff Harrison, Jeff Bagato, Daniel f. Bradley, Texas Fontanella & Stuart Wheatley, Penelope Weiss, Dave Read, Keith Nunes, Anna Cates, Sacha Archer, Douglas Barbour, John Levy, Marilyn Stablein, M. C. Rush, Cecelia Chapman & Jeff Crouch, gobscure, Tim Wright, Jen Schneider, William Repass, Ian Gibbins, Jill Jones, Marcia Arrieta, Gian Luigi Braggio, Holly Day, Mary Ellen Derwis, Tim Pilgrim, John McCluskey, Les Wicks, R. Keith, Michael Brandonisio, Tom Beckett, Bob Heman, Ella Skilbeck-Porter, John Pursch, Jesse Glass, Kristian Patruno, Martin Stannard, & Demosthenes Agrafiotis.

2019 Miles Franklin Literary Award shortlist unveiled

Copyright Agency, 3rd July 2019 The 2019 Miles Franklin Literary Award Shortlist is:
  • THE LEBS by Michael Mohammed Ahmad (Hachette Australia): This coming-of-age novel explores the life of Bani Adam, as he grows up in Sydney’s western suburbs in a post-9/11 political climate. Bani has to negotiate his sense of identity and belonging in this hostile, confusing world, while dreaming of so much more.
  • A SAND ARCHIVE by Gregory Day (Picador Australia): Seeking stories of Australia’s Great Ocean Road, a young writer stumbles across a manual from a minor player in the road’s history, engineer FB Herschell. The slim, grey volume appears unremarkable, but it paints a surprising portrait of its author between the lines.
  • A STOLEN SEASON by Rodney Hall (Picador Australia): This novel explores the stories of three people whose lives have been changed profoundly by war, men and money, and their experiences of a period of life they never thought possible.
  • THE DEATH OF NOAH GLASS by Gail Jones (Text Publishing): Having just returned from a trip to Sicily, art historian Noah Glass is discovered floating face down in the swimming pool at his Sydney apartment. Complicating matters, a sculpture has gone missing from a museum in Palermo, and Noah is a suspect. His children Martin and Evie must come to terms with their father’s death in this novel of grief, loss and artistic contemplation. Gail has previously been shortlisted for the Miles Franklin for Sixty Lights (2006), Dreams of Speaking (2007), Sorry (2008) and longlisted for Five Bells (2012).
  • TOO MUCH LIP by Melissa Lucashenko (The University of Queensland Press): Wise-cracking Kerry Slater has spent a lifetime avoiding two things – her hometown and prison. But now her Pop is dying and she’s an inch away from the lockup, so she heads south on a stolen Harley. With plans to spend 24 hours, tops, over the border, she quickly realises that family and Bundjalung country have other plans. Melissa has been previously longlisted for the Miles Franklin with Mullumbimby in 2014.
  • DYSCHRONIA by Jennifer Mills (Picador Australia): One morning, the residents of a small coastal town somewhere in Australia wake to discover the sea has disappeared. One among them has been plagued by troubling visions of this cataclysm for years. Is she a prophet? Does she have a disorder that skews her perception of time? Or is she a gifted and compulsive liar?
More here

Issue 53 of ‘Otoliths’ is now live

Forget Coachella! Issue 53, the southern autumn, 2019, issue of Otoliths, has more variety & much more talent. Plays, poems, paintings, reviews, stories, collaborations galore.

This issue contains work from Lynn Strongin, Jeff Bagato, Pete Spence, Kyle Hemmings, Seth Howard, Andrew Topel, Jim Leftwich, Steve Potter, Sanjeev Sethi, David Baptiste Chirot, Alison Ross, Mike Callaghan, John M. Bennett, Stephen Bett, Jim Meirose, Joel Chace, John Bradley, Dah, Ian Ganassi, Laura Bell, Emilio Morandi, Steve Dalachinsky, Jacob Kobina Ayiah Mensah, R. Keith, Cecelia Chapman, Keith Polette, Daniel de Culla, M. Liberto Gorgoni, Olivier Schopfer, Mary Cresswell, Jack Galmitz, Anton Yakovlev, B. J. Muirhead, Nina Živančević, Gregory Kimbrell, Cameron Lowe, Pat Nolan, Richard Kostelanetz, Daniel f. Bradley, Sheila E. Murphy, Adam Fieled, Bill Wolak, Márton Koppány, M.J. Iuppa, Gregory Stephenson, Elaine Woo, Karl Kempton, J. D. Nelson, Carol Stetser, Neil Leadbeater, Texas Fontanella, Tony Mancus & CL Bledsoe, gobscure, David Lohrey, Douglas Barbour, Keith Higginbotham, Guy R. Beining, Sarah Sarai, hiromi suzuki, Thomas Fink, Maya D. Mason, Carla Bertola, Tom Beckett, Randee Silv & Mumtazz, Mark DuCharme, Michael O’Brien, Elmedin Kadric, Keith Nunes, Bob Heman, John Kalliope, Rebecca Ruth Gould, Charles Borkhuis, Tony Beyer, Kenneth Rexroth, Maralena Howard, Stu Hatton, Michael Brandonisio, Brian Glaser, Penelope Weiss, Stephen Nelson, Tom Daley, Bernie Earley, Anna Cates, Jeff Harrison, John Levy, Vernon Frazer, Miro Sandev, Sabine Miller, Christopher Barnes, Nick Nelson, Jimmy Rivoltella, Katrinka Moore, Joe Balaz, Marilyn Stablein, Paul Pfleuger, Jr., John Pursch, Joseph Buehler, Colleen Woods, Michael Philip Castro, Michael Prihoda, Henry Crawford, Wes Lee, & Gay Beste Reineck.